Books & Movies


Great Movies

 

Taking Charge of ADHD 

Third Edition
The Complete, Authoritative Guide for Parents

Russell A. Barkley

From distinguished researcher/clinician Russell A. Barkley, this treasured parent resource gives you the science-based information you need about attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and its treatment. It also presents a proven eight-step behavior management plan specifically designed for 6- to 18-year-olds with ADHD. Offering encouragement, guidance, and loads of practical tips, Dr. Barkley helps you:

 

  • Make sense of your child's symptoms.
  • Get an accurate diagnosis.
  • Work with school and health care professionals to get needed support.
  • Learn parenting techniques that promote better behavior.
  • Strengthen your child's academic and social skills.
  • Use rewards and incentives effectively.
  • Restore harmony at home.

Updated throughout with current research and resources, the third edition includes the latest facts about medications and about what causes (and doesn't cause) ADHD.



See also Dr. Barkley's bestselling Taking Charge of Adult ADHD.



Winner—Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies Self-Help Seal of Merit

 

 

Martian Child (Topic Autism)  he skeptical, melancholy eyes of John Cusack anchor Martian Child, a sweet but not cloying story of a widowed man who adopts a misfit kid who believes he's from another planet. David Gordon (Cusack) is a successful science-fiction author--which is perhaps what leads a children's counselor (Sophie Okonedo, Dirty Pretty Things) to pair him with a would-be extra-terrestrial named Dennis (Bobby Coleman). Reluctantly at first, David tries to communicate with Dennis by fostering his belief--but as they grow attached to each other, the administrators of the organization that put them together sees this playing along as a failure to be a proper parent and threatens to take Dennis away. The first two-thirds or so of Martian Child are marvelous; though the scenario could be saccharine, the script and performances are full of details and complexities that make it feel genuine and affecting. The last third, unfortunately, seems to be the result of studio meddling, for the themes and emotions become awkwardly overstated. But what will stay with you are the moments of refreshing honesty and tender trust from the earlier part of the movie; the ending, clumsy and tone-deaf though it is, doesn't wipe away the delicate earlier interplay of David and Dennis. Also featuring Oliver Platt (Funny Bones), Amanda Peet (Igby Goes Down), and Anjelica Huston (Prizzi's Honor).

Martian Child (Topic Autism) he skeptical, melancholy eyes of John Cusack anchor Martian Child, a sweet but not cloying story of a widowed man who adopts a misfit kid who believes he's from another planet. David Gordon (Cusack) is a successful science-fiction author–which is perhaps what leads a children's counselor (Sophie Okonedo, Dirty Pretty Things) to pair him with a would-be extra-terrestrial named Dennis (Bobby Coleman). Reluctantly at first, David tries to communicate with Dennis by fostering his belief–but as they grow attached to each other, the administrators of the organization that put them together sees this playing along as a failure to be a proper parent and threatens to take Dennis away. The first two-thirds or so of Martian Child are marvelous; though the scenario could be saccharine, the script and performances are full of details and complexities that make it feel genuine and affecting. The last third, unfortunately, seems to be the result of studio meddling, for the themes and emotions become awkwardly overstated. But what will stay with you are the moments of refreshing honesty and tender trust from the earlier part of the movie; the ending, clumsy and tone-deaf though it is, doesn't wipe away the delicate earlier interplay of David and Dennis. Also featuring Oliver Platt (Funny Bones), Amanda Peet (Igby Goes Down), and Anjelica Huston (Prizzi's Honor).

 

 

Rising gymnast Dan Millman (Scott Mechlowicz, EuroTrip) has everything a college male could want: physical prowess, good grades, a chance at Olympic gold, and a parade of attractive girls eager to sleep with him. So why is his sleep troubled by violent dreams? While wandering late at night, he meets a mysterious man (Nick Nolte, Affliction) working at a service station, who sends Dan on a quest for his inner self--a quest that becomes crucial when Dan has a motorcycle accident and shatters one of his legs. Under the tutelage of "Socrates" (as Dan dubs the mysterious man), Dan finds a new strength both spiritual and physical. Peaceful Warrior is packed with philosophical aphorisms, ranging from "Knowledge is not wisdom" to "Take out the trash!", which some viewers will find energizing and others will find trite. What's most questionable about Peaceful Warrior is not whether or not you find its philosophy meaningful; it's that a movie supposedly about giving up control and living in the moment is--from plot structure to soundtrack--formulaic and manipulative. Based on the popular book Way of the Peaceful Warrior; also featuring Amy Smart (The Butterfly Effect).
Rising gymnast Dan Millman (Scott Mechlowicz, EuroTrip) has everything a college male could want: physical prowess, good grades, a chance at Olympic gold, and a parade of attractive girls eager to sleep with him. So why is his sleep troubled by violent dreams? While wandering late at night, he meets a mysterious man (Nick Nolte, Affliction) working at a service station, who sends Dan on a quest for his inner self–a quest that becomes crucial when Dan has a motorcycle accident and shatters one of his legs. Under the tutelage of "Socrates" (as Dan dubs the mysterious man), Dan finds a new strength both spiritual and physical. Peaceful Warrior is packed with philosophical aphorisms, ranging from "Knowledge is not wisdom" to "Take out the trash!", which some viewers will find energizing and others will find trite. What's most questionable about Peaceful Warrior is not whether or not you find its philosophy meaningful; it's that a movie supposedly about giving up control and living in the moment is–from plot structure to soundtrack–formulaic and manipulative. Based on the popular book Way of the Peaceful Warrior; also featuring Amy Smart (The Butterfly Effect).

 

 

From the Academy Award(R)-winning creators of TOY STORY and MONSTERS, INC. (2001, Best Animated Short Film, FOR THE BIRDS), it's FINDING NEMO, a hilarious adventure where you'll meet colorful characters that take you into the breathtaking underwater world of Australia's Great Barrier Reef. Nemo, an adventurous young clownfish, is unexpectedly taken to a dentist's office aquarium. It's up to Marlin (Albert Brooks), his worrisome father, and Dory (Ellen DeGeneres), a friendly but forgetful regal blue tang fish, to make the epic journey to bring Nemo home. Their adventure brings them face-to-face with vegetarian sharks, surfer dude turtles, hypnotic jellyfish, hungry seagulls, and more. Marlin discovers a bravery he never knew, but will he be able to find his son? FINDING NEMO's breakthrough computer animation takes you into a whole new world with this undersea adventure about family, courage, and challenges. Take the plunge into FINDING NEMO, a "spectacularly beautiful animated adventure for everyone"
From the Academy Award(R)-winning creators of TOY STORY and MONSTERS, INC. (2001, Best Animated Short Film, FOR THE BIRDS), it's FINDING NEMO, a hilarious adventure where you'll meet colorful characters that take you into the breathtaking underwater world of Australia's Great Barrier Reef. Nemo, an adventurous young clownfish, is unexpectedly taken to a dentist's office aquarium. It's up to Marlin (Albert Brooks), his worrisome father, and Dory (Ellen DeGeneres), a friendly but forgetful regal blue tang fish, to make the epic journey to bring Nemo home. Their adventure brings them face-to-face with vegetarian sharks, surfer dude turtles, hypnotic jellyfish, hungry seagulls, and more. Marlin discovers a bravery he never knew, but will he be able to find his son? FINDING NEMO's breakthrough computer animation takes you into a whole new world with this undersea adventure about family, courage, and challenges. Take the plunge into FINDING NEMO, a "spectacularly beautiful animated adventure for everyone"

It doesn't take long to see that Temple Grandin, the main character in this eponymous HBO movie, is, well, different–she (in the person of Claire Danes, who plays her) tells us before the credits start that she's "not like other people." But "different" is not "less." Indeed, Grandin, who is now in her 60s, has accomplished a good deal more than a great many "normal" folks, let alone others afflicted with the autism that Grandin overcame on her way to earning a doctorate and becoming a bestselling author and a pioneer in the humane treatment of livestock. It wasn't easy. The doctor who diagnosed her at age 4 said she'd never talk and would have to be institutionalized. Only through the dogged efforts of her mother (Julia Ormond), who was told that "lack of bonding" with her child might have caused the autism, did Grandin learn to speak; to go to high school, college, and grad school; and to become a highly productive scientist, enduring the cruel taunts of her classmates and the resistance of many of the adults in her life (most of whom are shown as either narrow-minded prigs or macho, chauvinist jerks). Her lack of social skills and sometimes violent reactions to the overstimulation in her environment made it tough to fit in, to say the least. Danes, who is in nearly every scene of director Mick Jackson's film, is remarkable, embodying Grandin's various idiosyncrasies (such as talking, too loud, too fast, and too much) without resorting to caricature. Jackson does a marvelous job of depicting not only her actual accomplishments (among other things, she took the "squeeze machine" created to "gentle" upset cattle and adapted it for herself, using it to replace the hugs she never got as a child; later on, she revolutionized the systems used to prepare cows for slaughter, as well as the design of the slaughterhouses themselves), but also her more abstract talents, especially the extraordinary visual acuity that enables her to remember virtually everything she's ever seen. This is mostly Danes's film, but the whole cast is top-notch, especially Ormond, Catherine O'Hara as Temple's aunt, and David Strathairn as one of the few teachers who saw Grandin's potential. Captivating, compelling, and thoroughly entertaining, Temple Grandin is highly recommended. –Sam Graham

 

 

 

 

 

Patch Adams raises two schools of thought: There are those who are inspired by the true story of a troubled man who finds happiness in helping others--a man set on changing the world and who may well accomplish the task. And then there are those who feel manipulated by this feel-good story, who want to smack the young medical student every time he begins his silly antics.   Staving off suicidal thoughts, Hunter Adams commits himself into a psychiatric ward, where he not only garners the nickname "Patch," but learns the joy in helping others. To this end, he decides to go to medical school, where he clashes with the staid conventions of the establishment as he attempts to inject humor and humanity into his treatment of the patients ("We need to start treating the patient as well as the disease," he declares throughout the film). Robin Williams, in the title role, is as charming as ever, although someone should tell him to broaden his range--the ever-cheerful do-gooder à la Good Will Hunting and Dead Poets Society is getting a little old. His sidekick Truman (Daniel London) steals the show with his gawky allure and eyebrows that threaten to overtake his lean face--he seems more real, which is odd considering that Patch Adams does exist and this film is based on his life. Monica Potter is the coolly reluctant love interest, and she makes the most of her one-dimensional part. While moments of true heartfelt emotion do come through, the major flaw of this film is that the good guys are just so gosh-darn good and the bad ones are just big meanies with no character development. Patch Adams, though, does provide the tears, the giggles, and the kooky folks who will keep you smiling at the end.

Patch Adams raises two schools of thought: There are those who are inspired by the true story of a troubled man who finds happiness in helping others–a man set on changing the world and who may well accomplish the task. And then there are those who feel manipulated by this feel-good story, who want to smack the young medical student every time he begins his silly antics. Staving off suicidal thoughts, Hunter Adams commits himself into a psychiatric ward, where he not only garners the nickname "Patch," but learns the joy in helping others. To this end, he decides to go to medical school, where he clashes with the staid conventions of the establishment as he attempts to inject humor and humanity into his treatment of the patients ("We need to start treating the patient as well as the disease," he declares throughout the film). Robin Williams, in the title role, is as charming as ever, although someone should tell him to broaden his range–the ever-cheerful do-gooder à la Good Will Hunting and Dead Poets Society is getting a little old. His sidekick Truman (Daniel London) steals the show with his gawky allure and eyebrows that threaten to overtake his lean face–he seems more real, which is odd considering that Patch Adams does exist and this film is based on his life. Monica Potter is the coolly reluctant love interest, and she makes the most of her one-dimensional part. While moments of true heartfelt emotion do come through, the major flaw of this film is that the good guys are just so gosh-darn good and the bad ones are just big meanies with no character development. Patch Adams, though, does provide the tears, the giggles, and the kooky folks who will keep you smiling at the end.

Great Books

 

PRAISE for the book:
PREVENT AND REVERSE HEART DISEASE 
by Caldwell B. Esselstyn, Jr., MD
“One of the most outstanding projects in health research of the past century. It's relevant, it's caring, it's innovative, it's extremely well executed and it's very, very useful." 
–T. Colin Campbell, Ph.D.,  author of The China Study
“Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn has directed pioneering research demonstrating that the progression of even severe coronary heart disease can often be reversed by making comprehensive change in diet and lifestyle.“
–Dean Ornish, M.D, founder, president and director of Preventive Medicine Research Institute and author of Dr. Dean Ornish’s Program for Reversing Heart Disease
“Dr. Esselstyn has always been ahead of his time. His focus on the healing powers of proper nutrition on diseased coronary arteries has now proven right, raising another unthinkable notion—that heart patients can cure themselves.”
–Bernadine Healy, M.D., former Director of the National Institutes of Health
“A hard nosed scientist shows us his secrets for successfully cleaning the rusting arteries of so many patients – and it doesn't even hurt.”
–Mehmet Oz, M.D., coauthor, You: The Owner’s Manual
“Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn, Jr., is certainly the father (and the mother) of the now proven hypothesis that you can reverse severe arterial disease (including severe disease of the arteries supposed to nourish your heart). He proved that radical changes in diet (and that alone) cause radical changes in the age and disease of your arteries—and that you can make your arteries much younger. 
"So even if you only want to try this plan five days a week, this book is a must purchase because of its great recipes that spice low fat plant based food to high taste—you may even want to enjoy (and know I am using that word specifically and as intentionally as the proposal I made to my wife 33 years ago) the recipes all 7 days. 
–Michael Roizen MD, coauthor of YOU: The Owner's Manual and YOU: On A Diet. The Owner's Manual to Waist Management
"This powerful program will make you virtually heart-attack proof. Based on decades of research, Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn has shown not only how to prevent heart disease, but how to reverse it-even for people who have been affected for many years. I strongly recommend this important book." 
–Neal D. Barnard, M.D., President, Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, and author of Breaking the Food Seduction
"If you have heart disease,this book should be essential reading.  It could save your life." 
–Michael F. Jacobson, Executive Director, Center for Science in the Public Interest
“Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease provides a practical approach for people to regain their lost health.  Considering the worldwide prevalence of coronary artery disease this book should become the bestseller of all times.”

–John McDougall, M.D., author of The McDougall Program
“Dr. Esselstyn’s solution in Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease is as profound as Newton’s discovery of gravity.  Half of all Americans dying today could have changed their date with the undertaker by following Dr. Esselstyn’s plan.”
–Howard F. Lyman, author of No More Bull!  and Mad Cowboy
“Dr. Esselstyn's eminently successful arrest-and-reversal therapy for heart disease through patient education and empowerment as the treatment of choice will send shock waves through a mercenary medical system that focuses largely on pills and procedures.”
–Hans Diehl, Founder & Director of the Coronary Health Improvement Program (CHIP)

 

 

 

 

Tim and Tom
AN AMERICAN COMEDY IN BLACK AND WHITE
TIM REID AND TOM DREESEN WITH RON RAPOPORT
264 pages | 16 halftones | 5-1/2 x 8-1/2 | © 2008
As the heady promise of the 1960s sagged under the weight of widespread violence, rioting, and racial unrest, two young men–one black and one white–took to stages across the nation to help Americans confront their racial divide: by laughing at it.

Tim and Tom tells the story of that pioneering duo, the first interracial comedy team in the history of show business–and the last. Tim Reid and Tom Dreesen polished their act in the nightclubs of Chicago, then took it on the road, not only in the North, but in the still-simmering South as well, developing routines that even today remain surprisingly frank–and remarkably funny–about race. Most nights, the shock of seeing an integrated comedy team quickly dissipated in uproarious laughter, but on some occasions the audience’s confusion and discomfort led to racist heckling, threats, and even violence. Though Tim and Tom perpetually seemed on the verge of making it big throughout their five years together, they grudgingly came to realize that they were ahead of their time: America was not yet ready to laugh at its own failed promise.

Eventually, the grind of the road took its toll, as bitter arguments led to an acrimonious breakup. But the underlying bond of friendship Reid and Dreesen had forged with each groundbreaking joke has endured for decades, while their solo careers delivered the success that had eluded them as a team. By turns revealing, shocking, and riotously funny, Tim and Tom unearths a largely forgotten chapter in the history of comedy.


 

   SEVEN PRINCIPLES FOR MAKING MARRIAGE WORK

 

    
by Dr. John Gottman

"Gottman comes to this endeavor with the best of qualifications: he's got the spirit of a scientist and the soul of a romantic." — Newsweek

 

Back in print!  The Spanish edition of The Seven Principles for Making Marriage Work

John Gottman has revolutionized the study of marriage by using rigorous scientific procedures to observe the habits of married couples in unprecedented detail over many years. Here is the culmination of his life's work: the seven principles that guide couples on the path toward a harmonious and long-lasting relationship. Packed with practical questionnaires and exercises, The Seven Principles for Making Marriage Workis the definitive guide for anyone who wants their relationship to attain its highest potential.

Los siete principios para hacer que el matrimonio funcione
John M. Gottman ha revolucionado el estudio del matrimonio utilizando procesos rigurosamente científicos para la observación de los hábitos de las parejas a través de muchos años en un detalle sin precedentes. Aquí está la culminación de una vida de trabajo: los siete principios que guían a las parejas en el camino hacia relaciones duraderas y armoniosas. Directo en su método, pero a la vez profundo en sus resultados, estos principios enseñan asombrosas nuevas estrategias para hacer que el matrimonio funcione. Gottman ayuda a las parejas a concentrarse el uno en el otro, a prestar atención al día a día y a los pequeños detalles que, puestos juntos, forman el corazón y el alma de cualquier relación. Acompañado de ejercicios y cuestionarios prácticos Los siete principios para hacer que el matrimonio funcione es la guía definitiva para cualquiera que quiera que su relación alcance su máximo potencial.

 

 

 
   

 

 

1-2-3 Magic : Effective Discipline for Children 2-12 

Surviving Your Adolescents: How to Manage-and Let Go of-Your 13-18 Year Olds

  
From School Library Journal Grade 4–7—Baskin writes in the voice of a high-functioning boy who identifies himself as having numerous disorders, most with labels that appear as alphabet soup. In the third grade, after yet another battery of tests, Jason receives the diagnosis of autism. Now in sixth grade, he relates how he does not fit in, even though he tries to follow the instructions of his therapists and helpers. He labels the rest of his classmates and teachers as neurotypicals, or NTs for short. While humor resonates throughout the book, the pathos of Jason's situation is never far from readers' consciousness. If only he could act on what he knows he needs to do, his life would be so much easier. Jason also shows himself to be a deep thinker and an excellent writer. Through his stories and thinly veiled fictional characters, Baskin reveals not only the obstacles that Jason faces, but also his fierce determination to be himself at all costs. Jason is a believable and empathetic character in spite of his idiosyncrasies. Baskin also does a superb job of developing his parents and younger brother as real people with real problems, bravely traversing their lives with a differently abled child without a road map, but with a great deal of love.
Grade 4-7-Twelve-year-old Catherine has conflicting feelings about her younger brother, David, who is autistic. While she loves him, she is also embarrassed by his behavior and feels neglected by their parents. In an effort to keep life on an even keel, Catherine creates rules for him (It's okay to hug Mom but not the clerk at the video store). Each chapter title is also a rule, and lots more are interspersed throughout the book. When Kristi moves in next door, Catherine hopes that the girl will become a friend, but is anxious about her reaction to David. Then Catherine meets and befriends Jason, a nonverbal paraplegic who uses a book of pictures to communicate, she begins to understand that normal is difficult, and perhaps unnecessary, to define. Rules of behavior are less important than acceptance of others. Catherine is an endearing narrator who tells her story with both humor and heartbreak. Her love for her brother is as real as are her frustrations with him. Lord has candidly captured the delicate dynamics in a family that revolves around a child's disability. Set in coastal Maine, this sensitive story is about being different, feeling different, and finding acceptance. A lovely, warm read, and a great discussion starter.
Further Reading
Further Reading
Always Looking Up